21210060 - Energy economics and climate change policy

This course consists in two modules. The first deals with basic concepts in Energy Economics as the distribution of sources and consumption patterns at the geographical level, the analysis of demand and supply of different energy sources and the use of energy by sectors. World energy outlook scenarios are deeply investigated. The second part of the course allows students gathering main analytical tools to consider jointly energy issues and climate change impacts. The economic analysis of policy impacts over the long term and burden sharing issues in the international bargaining process are also analyzed. At the end of the course students will be able to understand global energy and climate reports, conduct their own impact analysis and be familiar with main simulation models.

COSTANTINI VALERIA

teacher profile | teaching materials

Mutuazione: 21210060 Energy economics and climate change policy in Economia dell'ambiente e dello sviluppo LM-56 COSTANTINI VALERIA

Programme

Course Learning Objectives and Skill Acquisition
This course consists in two modules. The first deals with basic concepts in Energy Economics as the distribution of sources and consumption patterns at the geographical level, the analysis of demand and supply of different energy sources and the use of energy by sectors. World energy outlook scenarios are deeply investigated. The second part of the course allows students gathering main analytical tools to consider jointly energy issues and climate change impacts. The economic analysis of policy impacts over the long term and burden sharing issues in the international bargaining process are also analyzed. At the end of the course students will be able to understand global energy and climate reports, conduct their own impact analysis and be familiar with main simulation models.

Assessment
The course assessment will be based on two small dissertations that the students will write and present after the end of each part of the course, one on Energy Economics and one on Climate Policy issues, and on a final written exam formed by 5 open questions.

Course general schedule
Part I: Energy Economics
1. World Energy Outlook
2. Energy security and energy poverty
2. Fossil fuels economics
3. Energy price mechanisms
4. Alternative energy sources and clean energy technologies
Part II: Climate Change Policy
5. The science of climate change
6. Climate change impacts
7. Vulnerability and adaptation
8. Mitigation policies
7. The European low-carbon strategy

Detailed Teaching Agenda
Lecture #1: Introduction, practical information, data collection of participants
Part I: Energy Economics
Lecture #2: Introduction to the energy markets, composition of the energy mix
Lecture #3: Demand and supply, peculiarities of the energy markets
Lecture #4: How to read an energy balance: dimensions, sectors, sources
Lecture #5: Global energy markets and scenario building
Lecture #6: Energy price mechanisms: substitution elasticities
Lecture #7: Energy price mechanisms: the rebound effect
Lecture #8: Energy security and energy poverty
Lecture #9: Renewable sources: introduction and taxonomy
Lecture #10: Renewable sources: technological innovation and policy support
Lecture #11: The biofuels case: pros and cons of an eco-innovation
Lecture #12: Energy efficiency and policy support
Lecture #13: The EU Energy strategy: targets and policy instruments
Lecture #14: Dissertation on Energy Economics (Part I of the course, intermediate assessment)
Lecture #15: Dissertation on Energy Economics (Part I of the course, intermediate assessment)
Part II: Climate Change Policy
Lecture #16: The science of climate change
Lecture #17: Climate change impacts and economic damage
Lecture #18: Vulnerability and adaptation concepts
Lecture #19: The international institutional architecture for climate change
Lecture #20: Political bargaining at the international and level
Lecture #21: Mitigation actions and policy instruments
Lecture #22: The Emission Trading System and the EU experience
Lecture #23: The linkages between mitigation and economic performance
Lecture #24: Flexible mechanisms and developing countries
Lecture #25: The EU long-term low-carbon strategy
Lecture #26: Scenario building and policy impact evaluation
Lecture #27: The case of the EU long-term low-carbon strategy
Lecture #28: The case of the Green Climate Fund
Lecture #29: Dissertation on Climate Change Policy (Part II of the course, intermediate assessment)
Lecture #30: Dissertation on Climate Change Policy (Part II of the course, intermediate assessment)




Core Documentation

Teaching material will be available to students in a dedicated Dropbox folder.
Textbooks (available in the corresponding folders for Lecture number)
Bhattacharyya S.C. (2011), Energy Economics: Concepts, Issues, Markets and Governance, UK: Springer-Verlag. Chapters: 1, 2, 3 (pp. 41-61), 4 (pp.77-81), 5 (sect. 5.1.1-5.1.5), 6 (excl. 6.5), 7 (Appendix excluded for all chapters).
IEA (International Energy Agency) (2017), World Energy Outlook 2017. Chapters: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7.
IEA (International Energy Agency) (2016), Energy Efficiency Indicators. (pages 5-10).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Synthesis Report. (pages 1-31).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability Part A. (pages 1-32).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Mitigation of Climate Change (pages 41-107).
Tol R.S.J. (2014), Climate Economics: Economic Analysis of Climate, Climate Change and Climate Policy, Edward Elgar Publ. Chapters: 1,2,3,4,5,6.

Type of delivery of the course

Lectures 3 day a week. Classes are taken as standard lectures in the Faculty venue according to the Rules for distancing as available on the Roma Tre website. In the case of worsening of pandemic conditions due to COVID-19, online teaching activities on Teams will be activated. Students must register on the Moodle platform for attending the lectures (both live or online).

Attendance

Suggested but not compulsory

Type of evaluation

The course assessment will be based on two small dissertations that the students will write and present after the end of each part of the course, one on Energy Economics and one on Climate Policy issues, and on a final oral exam. In the case of restrictions to standard teaching activities due to COVID-19, both the presentations and the final oral exam will be on Microsoft Teams.

COSTANTINI VALERIA

teacher profile | teaching materials

Mutuazione: 21210060 Energy economics and climate change policy in Economia dell'ambiente e dello sviluppo LM-56 COSTANTINI VALERIA

Programme

Course Learning Objectives and Skill Acquisition
This course consists in two modules. The first deals with basic concepts in Energy Economics as the distribution of sources and consumption patterns at the geographical level, the analysis of demand and supply of different energy sources and the use of energy by sectors. World energy outlook scenarios are deeply investigated. The second part of the course allows students gathering main analytical tools to consider jointly energy issues and climate change impacts. The economic analysis of policy impacts over the long term and burden sharing issues in the international bargaining process are also analyzed. At the end of the course students will be able to understand global energy and climate reports, conduct their own impact analysis and be familiar with main simulation models.

Assessment
The course assessment will be based on two small dissertations that the students will write and present after the end of each part of the course, one on Energy Economics and one on Climate Policy issues, and on a final written exam formed by 5 open questions.

Course general schedule
Part I: Energy Economics
1. World Energy Outlook
2. Energy security and energy poverty
2. Fossil fuels economics
3. Energy price mechanisms
4. Alternative energy sources and clean energy technologies
Part II: Climate Change Policy
5. The science of climate change
6. Climate change impacts
7. Vulnerability and adaptation
8. Mitigation policies
7. The European low-carbon strategy

Detailed Teaching Agenda
Lecture #1: Introduction, practical information, data collection of participants
Part I: Energy Economics
Lecture #2: Introduction to the energy markets, composition of the energy mix
Lecture #3: Demand and supply, peculiarities of the energy markets
Lecture #4: How to read an energy balance: dimensions, sectors, sources
Lecture #5: Global energy markets and scenario building
Lecture #6: Energy price mechanisms: substitution elasticities
Lecture #7: Energy price mechanisms: the rebound effect
Lecture #8: Energy security and energy poverty
Lecture #9: Renewable sources: introduction and taxonomy
Lecture #10: Renewable sources: technological innovation and policy support
Lecture #11: The biofuels case: pros and cons of an eco-innovation
Lecture #12: Energy efficiency and policy support
Lecture #13: The EU Energy strategy: targets and policy instruments
Lecture #14: Dissertation on Energy Economics (Part I of the course, intermediate assessment)
Lecture #15: Dissertation on Energy Economics (Part I of the course, intermediate assessment)
Part II: Climate Change Policy
Lecture #16: The science of climate change
Lecture #17: Climate change impacts and economic damage
Lecture #18: Vulnerability and adaptation concepts
Lecture #19: The international institutional architecture for climate change
Lecture #20: Political bargaining at the international and level
Lecture #21: Mitigation actions and policy instruments
Lecture #22: The Emission Trading System and the EU experience
Lecture #23: The linkages between mitigation and economic performance
Lecture #24: Flexible mechanisms and developing countries
Lecture #25: The EU long-term low-carbon strategy
Lecture #26: Scenario building and policy impact evaluation
Lecture #27: The case of the EU long-term low-carbon strategy
Lecture #28: The case of the Green Climate Fund
Lecture #29: Dissertation on Climate Change Policy (Part II of the course, intermediate assessment)
Lecture #30: Dissertation on Climate Change Policy (Part II of the course, intermediate assessment)




Core Documentation

Teaching material will be available to students in a dedicated Dropbox folder.
Textbooks (available in the corresponding folders for Lecture number)
Bhattacharyya S.C. (2011), Energy Economics: Concepts, Issues, Markets and Governance, UK: Springer-Verlag. Chapters: 1, 2, 3 (pp. 41-61), 4 (pp.77-81), 5 (sect. 5.1.1-5.1.5), 6 (excl. 6.5), 7 (Appendix excluded for all chapters).
IEA (International Energy Agency) (2017), World Energy Outlook 2017. Chapters: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7.
IEA (International Energy Agency) (2016), Energy Efficiency Indicators. (pages 5-10).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Synthesis Report. (pages 1-31).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability Part A. (pages 1-32).
IPCC (2014), Climate Change 2014 – Mitigation of Climate Change (pages 41-107).
Tol R.S.J. (2014), Climate Economics: Economic Analysis of Climate, Climate Change and Climate Policy, Edward Elgar Publ. Chapters: 1,2,3,4,5,6.

Type of delivery of the course

Lectures 3 day a week. Classes are taken as standard lectures in the Faculty venue according to the Rules for distancing as available on the Roma Tre website. In the case of worsening of pandemic conditions due to COVID-19, online teaching activities on Teams will be activated. Students must register on the Moodle platform for attending the lectures (both live or online).

Attendance

Suggested but not compulsory

Type of evaluation

The course assessment will be based on two small dissertations that the students will write and present after the end of each part of the course, one on Energy Economics and one on Climate Policy issues, and on a final oral exam. In the case of restrictions to standard teaching activities due to COVID-19, both the presentations and the final oral exam will be on Microsoft Teams.